Articles

Neuromaani by Jaakko Yli-Juonikas

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  The Great Untranslated: Neuromaani by Jaakko Yli-Juonikas Posted on January 27, 2021 by The Untranslated The problems with Yili-Juonikas’ experimental 650-page novel Neuromaani start already with the title. According to translator Doug Robinson, who mentions this book in an interview for The Collidescope , the ambiguous title can be translated as Neuronovel , Neuromaniac , or My Neurocountry . Once you get past that, it gets only worse. There are at least three degrees of inaccessibility you have to reckon with when it comes to Neuromaani . Firstly, and most obviously, if you, like myself, don’t know Finnish, you cannot hope to read the novel even in theory, and all you are left with is the impressions of other people shared in a language you understand. The second degree is applicable to you if you know the language but have just learnt about the existence of Neuromaani . You still won’t be able

(In)visible Translations: An Interview with Douglas Robinson

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  (In)visible Translations: An Interview with Douglas Robinson Published on December 20, 2020 George Salis: Can you give us an overview (as descriptive as you’d like) of Finnish writer Volter Kilpi’s oeuvre? Douglas Robinson : It’s strange. It comes in three disparate bursts: first, around the turn of the century, three neo-romantic novels focused on biblical and mythological characters and themes, along with a collection of ecstatic essays; then, after 15 years of silence, two impassioned political tracts in the years of Finnish independence from Russia (1917, 1918); then, after another 15 years of silence, the major modernist works of the 1930s: the Archipelago series, consisting of his magnum opus Alastalon salissa (“ In the Alastalo Parlor ,” 1933), his follow-up short story collection Pitäjän pienemmät (“The County’s Littler Guys,” 1934, partly consisting of bits and piec

REVS

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  REVS’ Underground Autobiography Hannah Frishberg • Jul 02, 2014 Text is broken up by gaps in the wall: PAGE 22 (BTK) OF STILLWELL — WE WERE BOTH CHECKIN SHIT OUT MY PIECE ROLLED IN + THERE ON IR … ABOVE ME THAT … WE GO THRU THE … WRITES … THEN HE POINTS … A FEW SECONDS OF … HE NIPPED ME BUT I LET IT GO … BECOME FRIENDS—HE HAD A … WHO WROTE … I GOT TO KNOW … BKLYN WRITERS … NSA. ETC ONE DAY ME + IR … LUNCH AT THIS … ON SMITH ST — I BOCKROCKED … MEAT — HE DIDN’T ROCK … ASTOR DT CAUGHT ME + CUTTED ME IN THE BACK … + HE LET ME GO … LUCKY – REVS! | Photo courtesy of  Rebecca Fuller  | Click any image to launch a slideshow with more of REVS’ work “To Joe Pu

Post Card of Thomas Pynchon

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  Playing the Post Card of Thomas Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49 The difference between a collector of post cards and another [...] is that he can communicate with other collectors with the help of post cards, which enriches and singularly complicates the exchange. In the bookstore I felt that between them [collectors of post cards] they formed, from State to State, from nation to nation, a very powerful secret society in the open air. -- The Post Card: From Socrates to Freud and Beyond, Jacques Derrida. For many readers, the primary attraction of Thomas Pynchon's second novel, The Crying of Lot 49 (published in 1966) is the fact that it is short, a mere "novella," only 138 pages long in the paperback edition. By contrast, Pynchon's first and third novels, V. (1963) and Gravity's Rainbow (1973), are quite long, especially the latter, which is over 700 pages. Furthermore, the plot of The Crying of Lot 49 is relatively simple and straightf